茶の湯 in サンフランシスコ ・ Japanese Tea Ceremony を San Franciscoで

表千家四方社中の茶の湯ブログ Japanese Tea Ceremony Blog for Shikata Shachu – Omotesenke


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風炉から炉へ・From Furo to Ro

温暖化が進む現代社会では季節感が失われがちですが、「炉開き」を「息が白くなる頃」ともされていたそうです。面白い一節を読んだので書きとめます。

It is rather easy to lose touch with seasonal changes in our modern lifestyle, especially during this period of global warming.  “Robiraki” once was done around the time when “your breath turns white.”  Here is an interesting passage I read that I would like to shre:

そもそも本家本元の中国では一年を通して風炉やった。したがって、室町将軍家などの書院の茶も当然、年じゅう風炉。これを風炉の季節と炉の季節に二分するようになったのは、中国の茶の日本化ですね。日本人の生活の基本は農家ですから、そこに炉があって、息が白うなり寒さを感じるようになったら炉に火を入れ、客が来たらそこでもてなす。その古き佳き習慣をお茶に採り入れたんですね。採り入れたと申しますと継ぎ足したみたいにも聞こえますが、炉の採用で茶の湯は本当の茶の湯になったともいえるんやないでしょうか。つまり、舶来のお茶が日本の風土・風俗に根づいた、ということですね。

Originally in China, it was furo all year around.  Consequently, the “sho’in-style” tea (as exemplified by the tea practice of the Muromachi shogunate) naturally used furo all year long.  During the process of adapting the Chinese tea culture for Japan, there emerged two seasons: furo and ro.  In those days, the typical Japanese dwelling was a farm house, where you find a hearth (ro).  When it turned chilly, and the breath turned white, light fire in the hearth and entertain guests.  That age-old tradition was incorporated into the tea culture.  “Incorporated” may sound like it was just added on – but I think this incorporation of “ro” transformed the tea culture into the true chanoyu.  In other words, the tea culture of foreign origin took root in Japanese culture and customs.

「宗心茶話」(堀内宗心)世界文化社 2010

Originally published December 3, 2015

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炉開き茶会2016・Robiraki 2016

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北加同門会の主催で「炉開き茶会」が先日日曜日にサンフランシスコの日米会館で行われました。広間での薄茶3席に加えて濃茶4席が小間でありました。11月中旬とは思えないような暖かさで、お茶室の中では暑いくらいでした。

Robiraki Tea Event was hosted by the Northern California Domon-kai at the Nichibei Kaikan building.  There were three (3) sessions of usucha in hiroma (large room) and four (4) sessions of koicha in koma (small room).  It was unseasonably warm for mid-November.  It felt almost too hot inside the tea room.

お軸は「寿」。おめでたいですね。やはり炉開きはお茶の新年なのですね。

The scroll is “kotobuki” (felicitation, long life).  How auspicious!  “Robiraki” marks the beginning of a new year for tea world – and for that occasion, it was the appropriate scroll.

企画の皆さんお疲れ様でした。

Thank you for your efforts in organizing the event.


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棗で濃茶・Ko’icha with Natsume

中棗を仕覆に入れ濃茶の点前をする稽古をしました。中棗の場合は茶入のときと同様一人三杓の分量で掬い出しますが、小棗・大棗の場合にはお客様の人数分のお茶を入れておき点前中に全部空にします。

We practiced otema’e for preparing ko’icha using chu’u natsume (a medium-sized tea power container generally used for usucha) in shifuku (a cloth pouch).  When using cha’ire (a tea container for ko’icha), the host scoops out tea with chashaku – three scoops per guest.  It is the same when using chu’u natsume.  When using konatsume (a small-sized container) or o’onatsume (a large-sized container), however, tea has been measured for the number of guests present, and the entire content is emptied out during otema’e.

使った仕覆の裂地は唐花雙鳥長斑錦(からはなそうちょうちょうはんきん)です。「からはな」は訓読みなのですが、何故かその他は音読みで「おしどり」とも「にしき」とも読まないのが通常のようです。「長斑」とは二色または数色を縦に区画して縞目をあらわす文様のことです。

Shifuku we used is made of a fabric with a design called “karahana so’ucho’u cho’uhan kin.”  “Karahana” (唐花) is kunyomi (Japanese words represented by Chinese characters but retaining Japanese reading)* whereas “so’ucho’u” (雙鳥) and “kin” (錦) are both onyomi (phonetic reading similar to the original Chinese) – as opposed to “oshidori” (雙鳥) or “nishiki” (錦).  But that appears to be the usual practice.  “Cho’uhan” (長斑) is a pattern of two or more colors creating wide stripes.

* There was an interesting online discussion comparing kunyomi to “writing Victoria Regina and reading it as Queen Victoria” or “writing Lb. and reading it as pound.”

Originally published November 7, 2014