茶の湯 in サンフランシスコ ・ Japanese Tea Ceremony を San Franciscoで

表千家四方社中の茶の湯ブログ Japanese Tea Ceremony Blog for Shikata Shachu – Omotesenke


Leave a comment

会記は先に見るべき?・Should Kaiki Be Reviewed in Advance?

先日どなたかのお話で面白いことを聞きました。

The other day someone made an interesting comment during his talk.

その方は「会記は先に見ない。答えを見てから試験を受けるようなもの。亭主との問答がただの演技になってしまう。本当の驚き、喜びの方が意味がある。」と仰いました。

He said: “I don’t look at the kaiki (records of the tea event) in advance.  It is like taking an exam after seeing the answers.  That would reduce the exchanges with the host to a mere act.  A genuine surprise or joy would be more meaningful.”

会記に書かれていることをお尋ねすると「宿題をしなかった怠け者」と思われるのではとの懸念もありますが、お茶会でお正客になることなどあまりないでしょうからいらぬ心配かもしれません。

If I ask about something already covered in the kaiki, I am worried that someone may think of me as a lazy person who has not done my homework.  But that may be an unnecessary concern as it is very rare to be the first guest at a tea event.

読んでおいた方が通り一変の質疑応答を超えてもっと深く掘り下げる機会ができるのではないかな、とも思いました。

If you read it beforehand, I think you will have an opportunity to drill down deeper beyond cursory questions and answers.  Just my humble opinion….

Advertisements


Leave a comment

一期一会・Ichigo Ichi’e

一期一会。一生に一度だけの機会。生涯に一度限りであること。「一期」は仏教語で、人が生まれてから死ぬまでの間の意味です。Ichigo ichi’e.  A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.  It happens only once in your life.  “Ichigo” means the time between birth and death in the Buddhism terminology.

この言葉は「その機会を一生に一度のものと心得て、主客ともに互いに誠意を尽くすべき」、という茶会に臨む際の心得として広く知られています。

These words are widely known in the tea community as the ideal mindset in attending a tea event: “Both the host and guests must do their utmost as the opportunity may never be repeated in the same lifetime.”

もとは千利休の弟子宗二の「山上宗二記」に「一期に一度の会」と記されたことが始まりとのこと。これが江戸時代末期に井伊直弼が「茶湯一会集」において、自身の茶の湯一番の心得として「一期一会」を用いたことから一般に広まったそうです。

It is said that its origin is Rikyu’s disciple, So’uji.  He made an entry in his Yamano’u’e No So’uji Ki” (The “Yamano’u’e no So’uji Chronicle”) referring to “a meeting that happens only once in one’s life” (一期に一度の会).  In the late Edo Period, Na’osuke I’i adopted “ichigo ichi’e” as his principal motto of his tea life in his “Chanoyu ichi’eshu’u” (The Collection of Tea Meetings), which then subsequently spread to the public.

【参考・References】

http://gogen-allguide.com/i/ichigoichie.html

http://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/leaf/idiom/一期一会/m0u/

http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/一期一会


Leave a comment

置筒・Okizutsu

以前「園城寺」という竹の花入について書きましたが、竹の花入(置筒)を最初に使ったのは誰なのでしょうか。

We have written about a hanging bamboo hana’ire called Onjo’uji, but who was the first to use a bamboo hana’ire on the alcove floor (okizutsu)?

D会の月間誌にはこのような記述がありました。

Here is what an article in D-kai‘s monthly magazine says:

花入の創作の中で一つ問題なのは、竹の置花入が誰によって考案されたか、ということです。

When it comes to creation of hanai’re, one question is: whose idea was it to use a bamboo hana’ire on the floor?

そもそも竹の花入は草の道具で真の道具ではありません。真の道具の花入であれば、薄板にのせて床の真中に飾るのが約束です。胡胴や青磁などの唐物花入は置く花入です。ところが利休はその原則を崩します。黄瀬戸の立鼓の花入は掛花入ではありません。和物で、しかも新作の花入を置いたところが利休の独創。タブーを破る力です。(中略)

Bamboo hana’ire, of course, is not a utensil of “shin (真)” (formal) level.  It is a rule to display hana’ire, if it is a “shin” utensil, on a board in the middle of the alcove.  Chinese (karamono) hana’ire of bronze or celadon (both “shin” utensils) are to be displayed on the floor of the alcove.  But Rikyu breaks that rule.  Ryu’ugo hana’ire of kiseto finish (yellow seto glaze hana’ire in the shape of a Japanese hand drum with a cinched middle) is not for hanging.  It is made in Japan, and a new production on top of it (rather than an antique).  But Rikyu deviated from the “taboo” by placing it on the alcove floor.  That was his uniqueness.  [Omitted]

竹の花入も床の壁に掛けるのが原則です。その常識を破って竹花入を最初に床に置いたのは誰か。従来の研究では藤村庸軒ということになっています。庸軒は宗旦の弟子で、のちに『茶話指月集』を口述した大茶人です。庸軒作花入に「遅馬」という銘の花入があって、遅い馬ですから駆けられない(掛けられない)置く花入であるとういシャレなのです。

It is also a rule to hang bamboo hanai’re on the alcove wall.  Who broke from that tradition and placed it on the alcove floor?  According to conventional researches, it was Yo’uken Fujimura.  Yo’uken was a disciple of So’utan’s, and a well-accomplished tea-man who later dictated “Chawa Shigetsu Shu’u (茶話指月集)”.  Yo’uken made hana’ire and named it: “Oso’uma (Slow Horse).”  A slow horse cannot run (kakerarenai).  And the hana’ire is not for hanging (kakerarenai).  It is a play on words.  Kakeru (to run) in Japanese is a homonym of kakeru (to hang).

千家人物散歩 千宗旦(十五)
熊倉功夫氏筆
「同門」2015年5月